Showing all 9 results

  • This House of Sky Book

    This House of Sky by Ivan Doig

    Known as one of the defining authors of the American West, Ivan Doig grew up in White Sulphur Springs, Montana.  His book, This House of Sky is actually the reason Red Ants Pants Founder Sarah Calhoun moved to this little ranching town to start her company.  It’s a lovely and rich memoir that we highly recommend.

    Ivan Doig grew up in the rugged wilderness of western Montana among the sheepherders and denizens of small-town saloons and valley ranches. What he deciphers from his past with piercing clarity is not only a raw sense of land and how it shapes us but also of the ties to our mothers and fathers, to those who love us, and our inextricable connection to those who shaped our values in our search for intimacy, independence, love, and family. A powerfully told story, This House of Sky is at once especially American and universal in its ability to awaken a longing for an explicable past.

    $17.00
  • Blind Your Ponies Book

    Blind Your Ponies by Stanley Gordon West

    One of our top ten all time favorites, Blind Your Ponies introduces characters that enter your life, and they don’t leave. Based in Willow Creek, Montana, this novel is about a small town high school basketball team, but so much more.

    Hope is hard to come by in the hard-luck town of Willow Creek. Sam Pickett and five young men are about to change that.

    Sam Pickett never expected to settle in this dried-up shell of a town on the western edge of the world. He’s come here to hide from the violence and madness that have shattered his life, but what he finds is what he least expects. There’s a spirit that endures in Willow Creek, Montana. It seems that every inhabitant of this forgotten outpost has a story, a reason for taking a detour to this place–or a reason for staying. As the coach of the hapless high school basketball team (zero wins, ninety-three losses), Sam can’t help but be moved by the bravery he witnesses in the everyday lives of people–including his own young players–bearing their sorrows and broken dreams. How do they carry on, believing in a future that seems to be based on the flimsiest of promises? Drawing on the strength of the boys on the team, sharing the hope they display despite insurmountable odds, Sam finally begins to see a future worth living.

    Author Stanley Gordon West has filled the town of Willow Creek with characters so vividly cast that they become real as relatives, and their stories–so full of humor and passion, loss and determination–illuminate a path into the human heart.

    $17.00
  • Ride the Jawbone Book

    Ride the Jawbone by Jim Moore

    Ride the Jawbone weaves a compelling story of a gruesome murder and of a young lawyer who is called upon to defend the loathsome vagrant accused of the killing a young woman and throwing her body from the train.

    When no established attorney will defend the alleged murderer, the judge all but orders young T. C. Bruce, newly licensed to practice law, to undertake the task. While tracking the efforts of the young attorney to save his client from the hangman, the reader is transported back in time to central Montana, its ranching communities, and the famous Jawbone Railroad, as they existed at the turn of the twentieth century.

    Ride the Jawbone is a history lesson wrapped in a gripping mystery. Richard A. Harlow, without adequate financing is said to have jawboned the first railroad in central Montana into existence, a creation thereafter known only as the Jawbone. T. C. Bruce is the son of a rancher with a large spread near the newly created town of Two Dot. He loves ranching and is torn between pleasing his father, who wishes for him to take over the ranch, and his mother who wants him to put his education to use. Two young women, different in every aspect, lend spice to the story.

    Lessons in the history and culture of place are most enjoyable when encountered in a story with rich characters and a challenging plot. Ride the Jawbone, a 225 page paperback original, fills this bill effectively. Readers will learn much about the way of life of ranchers and other citizens of that place and time. The rich, eye-catching cover is crafted from a 1904 painting by R. E. DeCamp, which shows the Jawbone Railroad as it traveled through Sixteen Mile Canyon. A comprehensive discussion guide is included in the back of the book.

    About Jim Moore

    He was born Perry James (Jim) Moore III in Lewistown, Montana on December 21, 1927. He grew up on ranches and in small towns in Montana: Two Dot, Martinsdale, and Lewistown—and then Santa Barbara, California before moving back to the Moore Ranch at Two Dot.

    He attended the Two Dot grade school, graduated from Harlowton High School in 1945 and enlisted in the navy. Discharged from the navy, he enrolled in the University of Montana at Missoula in the fall of 1946. He transferred to Montana State University in the fall of 1948 and graduated from that institution in 1952 with a degree in Agricultural Economics.

    At Montana State he met Kathryn Nash. They were married on June 28, 1954 in Holy Rosary Church in Bozeman and made their home on the Moore Ranch. Three children – Dianne, Perry and Steven were born to the marriage.

    Jim studied the law at their home on the ranch and was successful in passing the bar examination. He practiced law in Harlowton and then in Bozeman, while maintaining his interest in the ranch. In addition to the ranch and his law practice, Jim was involved in a number of other activities and associations.

    $17.00
  • Last Bus to Wisdom

    Last Bus to Wisdom by Ivan Doig

    The final novel from a great American storyteller.

    Donal Cameron is being raised by his grandmother, the cook at the legendary Double W ranch in Ivan Doig’s beloved Two Medicine Country of the Montana Rockies, a landscape that gives full rein to an eleven-year-old’s imagination. But when Gram has to have surgery for “female trouble” in the summer of 1951, all she can think to do is to ship Donal off to her sister in faraway Manitowoc, Wisconsin. There Donal is in for a rude surprise: Aunt Kate–bossy, opinionated, argumentative, and tyrannical—is nothing like her sister. She henpecks her good-natured husband, Herman the German, and Donal can’t seem to get on her good side either. After one contretemps too many, Kate packs him back to the authorities in Montana on the next Greyhound. But as it turns out, Donal isn’t traveling solo: Herman the German has decided to fly the coop with him. In the immortal American tradition, the pair light out for the territory together, meeting a classic Doigian ensemble of characters and having rollicking misadventures along the way.

    Charming, wise, and slyly funny, Last Bus to Wisdom is a last sweet gift from a writer whose books have bestowed untold pleasure on countless readers.

    $17.00
  • Do Antelope Eat Cantaloupe? Book

    Do Antelope Eat Cantaloupe? by Margaret Wilhelm

    All creatures have features the world hasn’t known.
    Just dream and imagine and come up with your own.

    This whimsical, rhymed romp through an imaginative world of familiar creatures with unusual features will inspire playfulness and creativity in readers from toddlers on up!

    Charming full-color illustrations are full of surprising and funny details that are the perfect accompaniment to the inventive and sweetly irreverent text.

    Fun fact: Author Margaret Wilhelm is a retired English teacher from right here in White Sulphur Springs, Montana!

    $18.00
  • Sweet Thunder

    Sweet Thunder by Ivan Doig

    A beloved character brings the power of the press to 1920s Butte, Montana, in this latest from the best storyteller of the West.

    In the winter of 1920, a quirky bequest draws Morrie Morgan back to Butte, Montana, from a year-long honeymoon with his bride, Grace. But the mansion bestowed by a former boss upon the itinerant charmer, who debuted in Doig’s bestselling The Whistling Season, promises to be less windfall than money pit. And the town itself, with its polyglot army of miners struggling to extricate themselves from the stranglehold of the ruthless Anaconda Copper Mining Company, seems—like the couple’s fast-diminishing finances—on the verge of implosion.

    These twin dilemmas catapult Morrie into his new career as editorialist for the Thunder, the fledgling union newspaper that dares to play David to Anaconda’s Goliath. Amid the clatter of typewriters, the rumble of the printing presses, and a cast of unforgettable characters, Morrie puts his gift for word-slinging to work. As he pursues victory for the miners, he discovers that he is  enmeshed in a deeply personal battle as well—the struggle to win lasting love for himself.

    Brilliantly capturing an America roaring into a new age, Sweet Thunder is another great tale from a classic American novelist.

    $17.00
  • The Whistling Season

    The Whistling Season by Ivan Doig

    “Can’t cook but doesn’t bite.”

    So begins the newspaper ad offering the services of an “A-1 housekeeper, sound morals, exceptional disposition” that draws the hungry attention of widower Oliver Milliron in the fall of 1909. And so begins the unforgettable season that deposits the noncooking, nonbiting, ever-whistling Rose Llewellyn and her font-of-knowledge brother, Morris Morgan, in Marias Coulee along with a stampede of homesteaders drawn by the promise of the Big Ditch-a gargantuan irrigation project intended to make the Montana prairie bloom. When the schoolmarm runs off with an itinerant preacher, Morris is pressed into service, setting the stage for the “several kinds of education”-none of them of the textbook variety-Morris and Rose will bring to Oliver, his three sons, and the rambunctious students in the region’s one-room schoolhouse.

    A paean to a vanished way of life and the eccentric individuals and idiosyncratic institutions that made it fertile, The Whistling Season is Ivan Doig at his evocative best.

    $17.00
  • The Bartender’s Tale

    The Bartender’s Tale by Ivan Doig

    From a great American storyteller, a one-of-a-kind father and his precocious son, rocked by a time of change.

    Tom Harry has a streak of frost in his black pompadour and a venerable bar called The Medicine Lodge, the chief watering hole and last refuge of the town of Gros Ventre, in northern Montana. Tom also has a son named Rusty, an “accident between the sheets” whose mother deserted them both years ago.The pair make an odd kind of family, with the bar their true home, but they manage just fine.

    Until the summer of 1960, that is, when Rusty  turns twelve. Change arrives with gale force, in the person of Proxy, a taxi dancer Tom knew back when, and her beatnik daughter, Francine. Is Francine, as Proxy claims, the unsuspected legacy of her and Tom’s past? Without a doubt she is an unsettling gust of the future, upending every certainty in Rusty’s life and generating a mist of passion and pretense that seems to obscure everyone’s vision but his own. As Rusty struggles to decipher the oddities of adult behavior and the mysteries build toward a reckoning, Ivan Doig wonderfully captures how the world becomes bigger and the past becomes more complex in the last moments of childhood.

    $17.00
  • Work Song

    Work Song by Ivan Doig

    An award-winning and beloved novelist of the American West spins the further adventures of a favorite character, in one of his richest historical settings yet.

    “If America was a melting pot, Butte would be its boiling point,” observes Morrie Morgan, the itinerant teacher, walking encyclopedia, and inveterate charmer last seen leaving a one-room schoolhouse in Marias Coulee, the stage he stole in Ivan Doig’s 2006 The Whistling Season. A decade later, Morrie is back in Montana, as the beguiling narrator of Work Song.

    Lured like so many others by “the richest hill on earth,” Morrie steps off the train in Butte, copper-mining capital of the world, in its jittery heyday of 1919. But while riches elude Morrie, once again a colorful cast of local characters-and their dramas-seek him out: a look-alike, sound-alike pair of retired Welsh miners; a streak-of-lightning waif so skinny that he is dubbed Russian Famine; a pair of mining company goons; a comely landlady propitiously named Grace; and an eccentric boss at the public library, his whispered nickname a source of inexplicable terror. When Morrie crosses paths with a lively former student, now engaged to a fiery young union leader, he is caught up in the mounting clash between the iron-fisted mining company, radical “outside agitators,” and the beleaguered miners. And as tensions above ground and below reach the explosion point, Morrie finds a unique way to give a voice to those who truly need one.

    $17.00